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Taste Movie 2015

Posts by hailong01

Teva Pharmaceutical set for major layoffs in Israel, U.S.: report

TEL AVIV (Reuters) – Teva Pharmaceutical Industries is expected to cut 20-25 percent of its 6,860 workers in Israel and a few thousand more in the United States, financial news website Calcalist reported on Thursday.

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, the world’s biggest generic drugmaker and Israel’s largest company, is seen in Jerusalem February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun/File Photo

The world’s largest generic drugmaker will send termination letters to “tens of percents” of its 10,000 employees in the United States in upcoming weeks, Calcalist reported, citing people familiar with the matter.

New Teva CEO Kare Schultz is working out the details with regional management in Israel and the United States, Calcalist said, noting those set to be ousted include its chief scientific officer, Michael Hayden, Teva’s president of research and development.

A spokesman for Israel-based Teva declined to comment on the report.

Teva is widely expected to implement a cost-cutting program following the publication of third-quarter results earlier this month.

The company said it would miss 2017 profit forecasts due to falling prices of generics in the U.S. market and weakening sales of its multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone.

Saddled with nearly $ 35 billion in debt due to its $ 40.5 billion acquisition of Allergan’s generic drug business Actavis last year, investors have been pushing Teva for clarity on its future.

“It will be an absolute priority for me that we stabilize the company’s operating profit and cash flow in order to improve our financial profile,” Schultz said on a post-earnings call with analysts. [nL8N1N84VN]

Interim Chief Financial Officer Mike McClellan has said the company was “working on a 2018 plan and evaluating all options”.

Teva has been selling off assets to help meet its debt payments.

Fitch Ratings this month downgraded Teva’s debt to junk.

Reporting by Tova Cohen; editing by Jason Neely

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Exclusive: India pares back planned funding for crucial public health scheme

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India has approved a three-year budget for its flagship public health program almost 20 percent lower than what the health ministry said was needed, according to sources and previously unreported government documents reviewed by Reuters.

An ambulance arrives as people stand at the entrance of the emergency department of a government-run hospital in New Delhi, India, November 22, 2017. Picture taken November 22, 2017. REUTERS/Saumya Khandelwal

The federal finance ministry in August renewed the National Health Mission with $ 20 billion of funding between 2017-20, against the health ministry’s estimated requirement of $ 25 billion, the documents showed.

Officials familiar with the plan said the finance ministry reduced planned funding because of other spending priorities and because of state governments’ poor track record of spending the health budgets they’ve been allotted in the past.

The finance and health ministries did not respond to several requests for comment.

The National Health Mission is one of the world’s largest health programs and forms the backbone of public services in India. It provides everything from free drugs to immunization services to millions of rural poor.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has hiked federal funding for the overall health budget this year as part of a plan to improve care and meet a 2025 goal of raising health expenditure to 2.5 percent of GDP from the current 1.15 percent.

The National Health Mission typically accounts for about half of the federal health budget and officials said the lower spending approval would make achieving the government’s 2025 target more difficult.

NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

After focusing on maternal and child health for years, the program had planned to broaden its priorities to tackle the rising threat of non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Faced with the lower funding, the health ministry has reduced its three-year allocation to tackle NCDs such as cancer and diabetes to $ 1.4 billion, close to half of the estimated need of $ 2.4 billion, the documents showed.

The Lancet, a British medical journal, last week said NCDs caused a disease burden in India “like never before”. More than 60 percent of deaths in the country during 2016 were due to non-communicable diseases, up from about 38 percent in 1990, according to the publication.

While funding for such diseases up to 2020 will be higher than in recent years, the lower-than-planned approved funding will slow government efforts to tackle these diseases, two government officials said.

“The cutbacks in NCDs (spending) are dangerous … this can potentially stall the NCD screening and management plan,” said Oommen C. Kurian, a health researcher at the New Delhi-based think-tank Observer Research Foundation.

India this year introduced free NCD screening for patients in 100 districts, with plans to eventually cover the country.

Patients and their attendants wait outside the Out Patient Department (OPD) at a government-run hospital in New Delhi, India, November 22, 2017. Picture taken November 22, 2017. REUTERS/Saumya Khandelwal

Beyond non-communicable diseases, spending on strengthening the health system – such as improving district hospitals and patient transport services – will be an estimated $ 4.3 billion between 2017-20, a third lower than the ministry’s request.

Planned funding for immunization will be $ 2.9 billion versus $ 3.2 billion requested.

The spending breakdown for different schemes will be finalised once the health ministry is allocated funding in India’s annual budget.

HEALTH VS OTHER PRIORITIES

Modi’s government has taken steps to improve public healthcare including a 27 percent budget hike this year to $ 7 billion, accompanied by cuts to prices of critical medical devices and drugs.

Shamika Ravi, a health expert at Brookings India, said Modi’s government was also pursuing “fundamental structural reforms” to improve healthcare, such as the ranking of district hospitals and empowering state medical officers.

“There is a lot of background work happening,” said Ravi, who is also on Modi’s economic advisory council.

However, critics say more needs to be done to address the underfunded and overburdened public health system.

Some 900,000 children in India died before turning five in 2016, the highest in the world, The Lancet estimates.

In March, health officials faced criticism from other government departments for the National Health Mission’s inefficiencies and were asked to rework the renewal proposal for 2017-20 after they drew up spending estimates of $ 33 billion.

The health ministry revised the cost to nearly $ 25 billion, but the finance ministry reduced estimates by another $ 5 billion while approving the plan, the documents showed.

The estimates were pared back because Modi’s government has other priorities and because the finance ministry wants to control spending as it seeks to balance fiscal deficit targets while boosting growth, several government officials aware of the process said.

“It’s about political priorities – you have programs on roads, on infrastructure, on ports,” said one of the officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

The government is also concerned states do not have the governance capacity to spend large health budgets efficiently, officials said. A shortage of workers, bureaucratic bungling and slow procurement processes have plagued the states’ health systems.

More than $ 1.4 billion in health budgets was unspent by states by 2015-16, India’s federal auditor said earlier this year.

Editing by Tom Lasseter and Lincoln Feast

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Three coffees a day linked to more health than harm: study

LONDON (Reuters) – People who drink three to four cups of coffee a day are more likely to see health benefits than harm, experiencing lower risks of premature death and heart disease than those who abstain, scientists said on Wednesday.

FILE PHOTO: A Cappuccino stands on a table at a branch of Costa coffee in Manchester, Britain, March 18, 2016. REUTERS/Phil Noble/File Photo

The research, which collated evidence from more than 200 previous studies, also found coffee consumption was linked to lower risks of diabetes, liver disease, dementia and some cancers.

Three or four cups a day confer the greatest benefit, the scientists said, except for women who are pregnant or who have a higher risk of suffering fractures.

Coffee is one of the most commonly consumed drinks worldwide. To better understand its effects on health, Robin Poole, a public health specialist at Britain’s University of Southampton, led a research team in an “umbrella review” of 201 studies based on observational research and 17 studies based on clinical trials across all countries and all settings.

“Umbrella reviews” synthesize previous pooled analyses to give a clearer summary of diverse research on a particular topic.

FILE PHOTO: Customers enjoy their coffee at Caffe Nero in Manchester, Britain, April 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff/File Photo

“Coffee drinking appears safe within usual patterns of consumption,” Pool’s team concluded in their research, published in the BMJ British medical journal late on Wednesday.

Slideshow (2 Images)

Drinking coffee was consistently linked with a lower risk of death from all causes and from heart disease. The largest reduction in relative risk of premature death is seen in people consuming three cups a day, compared with non-coffee drinkers.

Drinking more than three cups a day was not linked to harm, but the beneficial effects were less pronounced.

Coffee was also associated with a lower risk of several cancers, including prostate, endometrial, skin and liver cancer, as well as type 2 diabetes, gallstones and gout, the researchers said. The greatest benefit was seen for liver conditions such as cirrhosis of the liver.

Poole’s team noted that because their review included mainly observational data, no firm conclusions could be drawn about cause and effect. But they said their findings support other recent reviews and studies of coffee intake.

Editing by Gareth Jones

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

U.S. judge strikes down Texas measure to limit second-trimester abortions

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) – A U.S. district judge on Wednesday struck down parts of a Texas law that would ban the most common type of second-trimester abortions in the state, after plaintiffs argued the procedure was safe, legal and necessary for women’s health.

U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel in Austin issued a permanent injunction against the provisions that were in legislation known as Senate Bill 8 (SB 8) and set to take effect this year, saying they “are facially unconstitutional.”

He added: “The act intervenes in the medical process of abortion prior to viability in an unduly burdensome manner.”

Texas, the most-populous Republican-controlled state, has been at the forefront of trying to impose abortion restrictions. In recent years, such legislation by the state has generally been struck down by federal courts that have often said the measures are unconstitutional because they place an undue burden on women and do not promote public health.

Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said his office had appealed the decision, adding SB 8 was lawful and protected “unborn human life from ghastly dismemberment abortions.”

Yeakel, appointed by former Republican President George W. Bush, wrote that “dismemberment abortion” was not a medical term used by physicians and the intent of the act was to ban the dilation and evacuation procedure. He said that resulted in an undue burden on a woman’s right to have an abortion.

While dilation and evacuation is used in most second-trimester abortions, nearly 90 percent of all abortions are performed in the first trimester, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports abortion rights.

“This is a huge win for Texas women and families,” said Amy Hagstrom Miller, president and chief executive of Whole Woman’s Health, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit.

Similar bans in other states including Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas and Oklahoma have also been struck down by courts.

The Texas law refers to the procedure as “dismemberment abortion,” in which a combination of suction and forceps issued to bring tissue through the cervix.

Opponents of the law say that after about 15 weeks of pregnancy, it is the safest method of abortion.

Texas lawmakers proposed SB 8 after the U.S. Supreme Court in June 2016 – in what legal analysts called the strongest endorsement of U.S. abortion rights in more than two decades – struck down a different Texas abortion law that imposed strict regulations on doctors and facilities.

Reporting by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by Peter Cooney

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

U.S. judge strikes down Texas law to limit second-trimester abortions

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) – A U.S. district judge in Austin on Wednesday struck down parts of a Texas law that would restrict the most common type of second-trimester abortions in the state, after plaintiffs argued the procedure was safe, legal and necessary for women’s health.

U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel issued a permanent injunction against the provisions that were in legislation known as Senate Bill 8 (SB 8) and set to take effect this year, saying they “are facially unconstitutional.”

He added: “The act intervenes in the medical process of abortion prior to viability in an unduly burdensome manner.”

Texas, the most-populous Republican-controlled state, has been at the forefront of trying to impose abortion restrictions. In recent years, it has seen its legislation struck down by federal courts that have often said the measures are unconstitutional because they place an undue burden on women and do not promote public health.

Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said he would appeal the decision, adding SB 8 was lawful and protected “unborn human life from ghastly dismemberment abortions.”

The second-trimester procedure known as “dilation and evacuation” is used in about 8 or 9 percent of abortions, while nearly 90 percent of abortions are performed in the first trimester, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports abortion rights.

“This is a huge win for Texas women and families,” said Amy Hagstrom Miller, president and chief executive of Whole Woman’s Health, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit.

Reporting by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by Peter Cooney

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Judge strikes down Texas law to limit second-trimester abortions

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) – A U.S. district judge in Austin on Wednesday struck down parts of a Texas law that would restrict the most common type of second-trimester abortions in the state, after plaintiffs argued the procedure is safe, legal and necessary for women’s health.

U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel issued a permanent injunction on the provisions to limit the type of second-trimester abortion that were in legislation known as Senate Bill 8, saying they “are facially unconstitutional.”

Reporting by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by Peter Cooney

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Female doctors adjust lives to accommodate home

(Reuters Health) – Female physicians are more likely to make professional adjustments to accommodate their responsibilities at home, according to a new study.

In particular, male doctors tend to have more help at home for childcare or elder care, the study authors reported online November 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Nearly half of the spouses of male physicians stopped working professionally, versus 9% of spouses of female physicians.

“Although some might argue that the decision for women to stop working professionally, especially after having children, is volitional, I think it’s very hard to disentangle the influence of societal expectations from that ‘choice,’” said study author Dr. Dan Ly of Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts.

In earlier work, Ly and colleagues had found that the gender earnings gap among doctors has remained at about 20% for the past three decades. Furthermore, among physicians who teach at medical schools, women are less likely to obtain the highest rank of full professor.

“To try to explain some of these gender differences in pay and professional advancement among physicians, we have begun to look at home life,” Ly told Reuters Health by email.

Ly and colleagues looked at Census Bureau data between 2000-2015 to understand occupation, income, hours worked outside the home and graduate education status for 30,900 male doctors and 17,600 female doctors. They also looked at the number of children in families with a male doctor, a female doctor, or two doctor parents.

They found that 17% of male doctors were married to female doctors, whereas 31% of female doctors were married to male doctors.

Income, hours worked outside the home, and graduate education status differed greatly between female spouses of male doctors and male spouses of female doctors.

Overall, 52% of female doctors’ spouses had a graduate degree, compared to 40% of male doctors’ spouses. In couples with one doctor, the number of children was higher in families with a sole male physician versus a sole female physician. In addition, for all women, the average number of paid work hours decreased as the male spouse’s paid work hours increased.

“We think one possible reason for this is that societal expectations for women to reduce their professional hours to care for children exist, even for physicians,” Ly said.

Future studies will continue to look at the decisions that couples make about balancing each other’s careers and how having children factors into those decisions, he said.

“It’s important to understand why women in medicine and other professions might be facing unique challenges, even today,” Dr. Reshma Jagsi, director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, told Reuters Health by phone.

“Those of us in Generation X were raised with expectations of the egalitarian division of labor at home and work, and we might not expect the findings seen in studies like these,” said Jagsi, who researches the gender pay gap and gender domestic differences in medicine but who wasn’t involved Ly’s study.

Jagsi and colleagues are monitoring several new programs that have been implemented to help doctors at work and home. The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, for example, gave grants to 10 medical schools as the Fund to Retain Clinical Scientists to fund more mentorship and career development opportunities for early-career doctors, especially for those with extra caregiving burdens.

“Patients benefit when the medical workforce includes the most promising doctors in our society,” Jagsi said. “We need both women and men in the medical workforce, and we need to figure out ways society can alleviate the greater challenges faced by female physicians.”

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Motorcycle crashes cause far more severe injuries than car accidents

(Reuters Health) – Motorcycle crashes are much more likely to cause severe injuries, fatalities and extensive medical costs than car accidents, a Canadian study suggests.

While plenty of previous research has documented the potential for motorcycle collisions to lead to far more extensive injuries than car crashes, the current study offers fresh evidence of the financial toll, researchers write online November 20 in CMAJ.

Researchers examined data on 26,831 patients injured in motorcycle crashes and 281,826 hurt in car accidents. Overall, the injury rate for motorcycle crashes was three times the injury rate for car crashes, the study found.

Severe injuries were 10 times more likely with motorcycle crashes.

Motorcycle crashes, meanwhile, cost about twice as much as car accidents to treat over the first two years after the collisions. The average cost with motorcycle crashes was $ 5,825 Canadian dollars (about US$ 4,569) compared with $ 2,995 (about US$ 2,349) for car accidents.

“We have shown that (accidents involving) motorcycles are considerably more dangerous and costly than (those involving) cars, and it is likely that will always be the case,” said lead study author Dr. Daniel Pincus of Sunnybrook Hospital and the University of Toronto.

“The study matters because despite considerable improvements in motor vehicle safety over the last 20 years, mortality and morbidity attributed to motorcycle trauma has remained stable or increased,” Pincus said by email. “Estimating the medical costs of care for motorcycle crashes may provide an additional incentive to improve safety.”

Pincus and colleagues looked at medical records for Ontario residents who were treated in emergency departments or admitted to the hospital after car or motorcycle crashes between 2007 and 2013.

To evaluate the medical costs of crash injuries, researchers examined compared costs of treating accident victims to a control group of otherwise similar individuals in Ontario who were not in collisions.

The annual injury rate for motorcycles was 2,194 people out of every 100,000 registered owners, compared with 718 people out of every 100,000 registered car owners, the study found.

With costs roughly doubled and injury rates roughly three times higher with motorcycles than with cars, researchers estimated that the total health costs of injuries was about six times higher for motorcycle owners than for car owners.

The study wasn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove whether or how motorcycle crashes might cause worse injuries or higher medical costs than car crashes.

Researchers also lacked data on costs covered by private health insurance or indirect costs such as lost wages or reduced productivity incurred by individual patients.

Even so, the findings add to the evidence linking motorcycle crashes to a higher risk of injuries, said Dr. Lois Lee, an emergency medicine physician at Boston Children’s Hospital and researcher at Harvard Medical School who wasn’t involved in the study.

Because motorcyclists are much more exposed on the road, there’s a much higher risk that crashes will result in injuries to the thorax, abdominal area, head and extremities, Lee said. Helmets help prevent head injuries but don’t protect the rest of the body.

“Motorcyclists should understand the increased dangers associated with riding a motorcycle and that the risk of serious injury and medical costs are significantly increased compared with riding inside an automobile involved in a motor vehicle crash,” Lee said by email. “To try to mitigate head injuries, motorcyclists should wear a helmet and follow the posted speed limit.”

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Slow-Cooker Turkey-Vegetable Soup

As the weather gets colder, you cravings for tummy-warming soup are rising. Finding a soup that’s equal parts tasty, filling, and nutritious can be difficult, since canned soups are loaded with excess sodium and preservatives. And although chili is a timeless classic, whipping up the meat and beans-based stew every time you bring out the slow cooker can get boring.

RELATED: 12 Healthy Soup Recipes

Enter slow-cooker turkey vegetable soup. It’s easy to prepare, filling, and healthy, thanks to ingredients like turkey legs, zucchini, barley, parsnips, and kale. Plus, it only requires 25 minutes of preparation. Once you add all of your ingredients to the slow cooker, you’re hands-free and can let the soup simmer for four hours. Then, it’s ready to eat!

Did we mention slow-cooker turkey vegetable soup is packed with nutrients? Carrots offer beta carotene to promote eye health, leafy green kale packs fiber and folate, and zucchini brings antioxidants, vitamin A, and potassium to this soup recipe. Plus, lean meat from turkey legs packs protein, to keep you feeling satisfied for longer.

Recipe Is:

How to Make It

Step 1

Combine onion, celery, garlic, thyme, sage, and 1 tablespoon oil in a 6-quart slow cooker. Cover and cook on high until vegetables have slightly softened, about 10 minutes.

Step 2

Meanwhile, heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add turkey legs; cook until well browned on all sides, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer to slow cooker; add broth, carrots, and parsnips. Reduce heat to low, cover, and cook until turkey is very tender, about 4 hours.

Step 3

Remove turkey legs from slow cooker. Cut meat from bones and shred meat; discard bones. Return meat to slow cooker. Stir in kale, barley, salt, pepper, and zucchini. Cover and cook on low until barley is tender, about 1 hour. Discard thyme sprigs. Stir in lemon juice.

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Ex-WellCare general counsel gets six months in U.S. prison

(Reuters) – A former general counsel of insurer WellCare Health Plans Inc was sentenced on Wednesday to six months in prison for making a false statement to Florida’s Medicaid program as part of what prosecutors called a sophisticated healthcare fraud scheme.

Thaddeus Bereday, who was indicted in 2011 along with four other former WellCare executives, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge James Moody in Tampa, Florida, after pleading guilty to a false statement charge in June, according to court records.

Bereday, 52, was also sentenced to three years of supervised release during which he must spend one year in home confinement, prosecutors said. He was also ordered to pay a $ 50,000 fine.

His lawyer, Jack Fernandez, declined to comment.

Bereday’s plea came after the U.S. Supreme Court in April declined to hear former WellCare Chief Executive Todd Farha’s appeal of his 2013 conviction over his role in the scheme to cheat the Medicaid health insurance program for the poor.

Prosecutors said Farha and others engaged in a scheme to file false Medicaid expense reports to Florida’s healthcare administration, overstating the amount the company’s subsidiaries spent on mental health services for Medicaid patients.

Under a 2002 Florida law, companies were required to spend 80 percent of the Medicaid dollars they received for mental health services, and return the difference if they spent less.

According to court papers, Tampa-based WellCare created a new unit to pay mental healthcare providers while retaining millions of dollars in Medicaid financing that should have been refunded.

A federal jury in 2013 convicted Farha, former Chief Financial Officer Paul Behrens and former vice presidents William Kale and Peter Clay.

In 2014, Moody sentenced Farha to three years in prison, Behrens to two years in prison, Kale to one year in prison and Clay to five years of probation.

Due to health issues, Bereday was scheduled to be tried separately. He pleaded guilty five months ago instead.

According to court papers, Bereday has also agreed to pay $ 4.5 million to settle a related lawsuit by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

WellCare in 2009 agreed to pay at least $ 217.5 million to resolve criminal and civil investigations by the U.S. Justice Department. It also agreed to pay $ 10 million to resolve related claims by the SEC.

WellCare did not respond to a request for comment.

The case is U.S. v. Farha et al, U.S. District Court, Middle District of Florida, No. 11-cr-115.

Reporting by Nate Raymond in Boston; Editing by Tom Brown

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.